Posts Tagged ‘Google+’

I can’t help but correlate the retirement of Google Wonder Wheel tool with the release of Google Knowledge Graph. There is simply an uncanny resemblance with how these two Google products work. While the purpose of this post is not specifically to reverse engineer and explain how knowledge graph works, I can categorically say that after Google killed one of the most amazing and legitimate SEO copywriting tools I’ve seen they gave us something that we can work on to gain advantage for our website while doing the web the very good it Google Knowledge Graph1 How To Do Google Knowledge Graph SEOdeserves.

What Is Google Knowledge Graph?

The Google Knowledge Graph is the next evolution in search engine for it no longer returns raw information from your search queries, instead, it will now return knowledge. As Mashable puts it, Google search suddenly becomes 1,000 times smarter and I couldn’t agree more.

The Knowledge Graph enables you to search for things, people or places that Google knows about—landmarks, celebrities, cities, sports teams, buildings, geographical features, movies, celestial objects, works of art and more—and instantly get information that’s relevant to your query.

You can see a video on how this new product works:

One might argue that this is another step for Google to police the web and dictate what we should see when we enter search queries, but isn’t that already what has been going since Google became a verb synonymous to search? So since we clearly can’t beat Google, let’s just join them.

Google Knowledge Graph SEO

1. Capitalize On Latent Semantic Indexing Or LSI

Note that the first three tips on this post extrapolate the ways Google Knowledge Graph improves the search based on their official release.

Now what is LSI? Wikipedia gives us a very scientific and algorithmic definition of the term.

Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) is an indexing and retrieval method that uses a mathematical technique called Singular value decomposition (SVD) to identify patterns in the relationships between the terms and concepts contained in an unstructured collection of text. LSI is based on the principle that words that are used in the same contexts tend to have similar meanings. A key feature of LSI is its ability to extract the conceptual content of a body of text by establishing associations between those terms that occur in similar contexts.

LSI is an old concept and it relates to the use of words based on context as oppose to well, use of it without context. It means that Google indentifies the meaning of words based how they’re used in content, blog posts, articles, meta description like keyword data, ebooks etc.

I have here new examples.

The word “markup” can either be used on a sentence from a blog post in the following:

Implementing Google Authorship Markup increases click through rate or CTR according to the latest SEO experiment we conducted.

That real estate broker’s high markup cost dwindles the chance of this prime property being sold to the market.

The word “marvel” can be used on the following set of (meta) keywords:

Marvel, Avengers, Iron Man, Captain America, Thor, Hulk

marvel, wonder, 7 wonders of the world, amazing places, great pyramid of giza, hanging gardens of Babylon

This means that when you write content for both humans and search engines (in terms of metas) you should always consider LSI, which would literally mean the further use of related keywords and key phrases to your keywords. It makes your content appear authoritative, natural and not spammy. More importantly, it guides you in providing a more relevant, long lasting and often timely content.

Because language is ambiguous, using LSI can always help Google find the right meaning and knowledge that the content you produced tries to impart.

Here are final takeaways from my SEO presentation about the use of LSI:

  • Use semantically related terms
  • Use niche jargon / industry standard terms liberally
  • Add popular mother or seed KWs when only writing for its long tail
  • Use brand names when applicable
  • Mention celebrities, industry leaders / pioneers

2. Knowledge (Not Just Information Or Keywords) As Summary

Rainbow Oil Rubiks Cube by Gray37 How To Do Google Knowledge Graph SEOGoogle Knowledge Graph tells us the importance of a more relevant, useful and original summary. The example on the official Google post takes in by putting a lot of information (new and unique for the most part) and writing it as a foundation for new knowledge.

How can we differentiate writing keywords vs writing knowledge as summaries?

Based on the examples given by Google, what’s contained in their summaries are actually highly expandable subjects and topics that all merit the same (or close to the) amount of writing and research as the first main topic. We’ll have more of this subject in the future.

Knowledge has a very critical use by searchers and these things should be considered when coming up with the summary:

  • Knowledge affects thinking, as opposed to Information which obviously informs. The difference is this: an article simply telling you that Google has released the Knowledge Graph vs an article telling you that Google has released the Knowledge Graph AND how you can react to it as an SEO and how you can use the very system to gain more exposure, traffic, authority etc.
  • Contains (among other things) ideas, concepts, contexts and meanings.
  • Says something new and not easily replicable. Of course you can repeat the news that Google has released the Knowledge Graph in your post and you can also write about Google has released the Knowledge Graph and how you can react to it as an SEO and how you can use the very system to gain more exposure, traffic, authority BUT the latter would impeccably require you to do more research or at least link to this post, because:
  1. It has affected your idea and knowledge of the subject
  2. It has affected (or will affect) you on your strategies for the Google Knowledge Graph, whether subconsciously or not (which happens to be the purpose of this post)

.. And that is precisely what differentiates summarizing with Knowledge vs summarizing with Information (or keywords alone).

3. Write Deeper And Broader

Ostrich Pen 224x300 How To Do Google Knowledge Graph SEOGoogle post noted:

And we can now sometimes help answer your next question before you’ve asked it, because the facts we show are informed by what other people have searched for.

Yes, you read it right. That’s answering the question even before the searcher asked it. This after all is the real future of search, an algorithm that gives you more than what you asked for.

For content producers this implies that our article and posts must give more value than what searcher originally intended to look for. It also means that thin content, those that are mere rewrites of what already can be found elsewhere isn’t really a search engine algorithmic change bulletproofed content.

Take note of these things when SEOing with Google Knowledge Graph in consideration:

  • Produce in-depth contents, the kind of segments that you will see on documentaries rather than short and standard news on standard 6 o’clock news.
  • If you cannot expound a subject on your content (due to time constraints or lack of expertise), mention it and link to an authority page discussing the topic
  • Human interest plays a lot of factor in determining what information to write and include (depending on the subject and focus of your content)
  • Answer as many important questions on your content as possible
  • Stay away from linear writing. A content that has no dimension or depth will soon be dead. Always think of how you can add new meaning to your content, again, unique but more importantly original
  • For non-news content, think of the impact of your content say a month from now, a year from now, if it will be totally useless after a considerable amount of time then it mean that you’re not really adding value to the web

4. Branch Your Content Distribution

Branching where your content appears will not only help your main website or your brand but might also help Knowledge Graph one way or another.

Because the new system banks on giving in knowledge and not just raw information, spreading and syndicating your content on different websites based on the type of information they give (which ultimately becomes the source of knowledge) can do nothing but help your content. Here are a few examples of websites where you can share, syndicate or link your content from:

5. Add Pictures To Your Content

With Camera by Pitrisek How To Do Google Knowledge Graph SEOGoogle Knowledge Graph thrives on pictures, eye catching pictures. And in case you need to hear it, people are visual and the old mantra that a picture paints a thousand words remains to be true to date. Make sure you always add relevant pictures and eye-catching image on your content, not just on your own page but for the pages where you syndicate your content as well.

As always just make sure you do proper attribution or ask permission to the owner of the image. There are many sources of high quality images and even artwork that you can use such as the following:

6. Add Videos To Your Content

Not a lot of people like to read. If you’ve reached this part of my post without skipping tips 1 – 5, then it means you’re among those people who still like to read. So what does that imply? First you’re among the endangered species of Internet user. Second, important content gets good and real readers. But that doesn’t mean that you cannot add video to your content when you already have written something that is worth reading.

Take for example WhiteBoard Friday by SEOMoz, they have good videos and always along with it are transcriptions of the video – which can stand as the written content (along with the video). The same goes to Google’s official blog, they usually have videos alongside their content. Why?

  • Videos and written content can go hand in hand
  • Videos and written content are both shareable, and that means twice the channel where you can get traffic and twice the chance to get viral
  • Long block of text is never a good thing
  • Videos can reduce bounce rate especially when they’re hosted on YouTube (I know there should be a study to support this, I should publish one soon)

How do you think Google Knowledge Graph will affect SEO? Do you have tips on how we can maximize this new system for our websites? Share it in the comment section. Don’t forget to share this post to your colleagues too, they might pick a thing or two from my efforts.

Thanks to Kim of the World for this great article.

Graham Knowles www.DigitalGuerilla.com.au

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Another great free ebook from our friends at Hubspot – Enjoy!

Two new networks have emerged on the social media landscape, demanding the attention of marketers. google+, with more than 100 million active users, and pinterest, now the third most-popular social network in the u.s., are competing for wide adoption and luring businesses that want to keep up with the new hangout spots of their audiences… Where should you market your business?

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Cadbury Makes Its Google+ Page Out of Chocolate.

Cadbury loves Google+ and are pumping up on the great PR they have already received by switching their allegiances from Facebook. Not only has the UK-based chocolatier launched a product through Google’s social network, has also now created a chocolate version of its Google+ page.

The confection was created to celebrate a recent milestone: 500,000 “circlers,” or fans.

Cadbury chronicled the construction of its edible Google+ page through a series of 10 step-by-step photos, shown in this gallery.

 

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Coke, Disney and Starbucks have been the clear winners in the Facebook popularity contest, however when it comes to Google’s Social Media platform these guys have taken their eyes off the ball!  The Swedish clothing chain H&M have hit the ground running on Google+ and seem to have grasped exactly what is required to create a stir and grab the attention – Google only launched their brands pages in November last year and already H&M have a stonking 541,276 in their “Circles” of influence!

A H&M spokeswoman Jennifer Ward commented: “At Google+ we have chosen to focus on inspiration… nice images, films, and, of course, a lot of fashion.”

Ward says H&M doesn’t discuss the specifics of its social media strategies. However it clear they understand the “linked up” approach: lots of pics of people sporting H&M clothes, together with a quick caption. Even better, they include a link to buy the given clothing.

Experts have picked up some other key elements to H&M’s strategy on Google+, and laid out how Google’s platform differs from Facebook.

Post photos, and often

Nearly every post on H&M’s Google+ page includes a photo or video. For a fashion brand, that’s a no-brainer… H&M is selling clothing, which in ads means a lifestyle. The way to market this is not through words but through visuals.

For other brands, visuals may not be quite as important, the model depends on the brand. While visuals are always important, words—explanatory text—can be just as crucial.

You will notice H&M posts to Google+ quite frequently. For instance, the company posted more than two dozen photos to the site Monday, along with a few other updates.

“Ordinarily, I’d advise against this inundatory approach, but it’s hard to argue with H&M’s success,” says one social media expert.

According to Ward, “We think it is important to be active and post news every day, just as in our other social media channels, and we are also careful to make sure that what we publish is relevant to our followers.”

H&M knows its audience of shoppers looking for affordable, “indie” fashions and who often come to stores looking for new items. The content (on H&M’s Google+ page) is relatively ‘indie,’ and by extension, trendy, featuring artistic, aesthetically pleasing photos and videos filled with indie celebrity names like Sofia Coppola, Drew Barrymore, Milla Jovovich, Rose McGowan, Shirley Manson, Lykke Li, Freida Pinto, Mena Suvari, Anton Yelchin, Rashida Jones and David Beckham.

It has also been noted that H&M frequently posts about contests on its Google+ page.

“This is a tried-and-true-strategy from Facebook brand marketing that traditionally works well.”

Exclusivity

H&M constantly tells its Google+ following that the content is “exclusive” and they’re getting a “first look” at a new collection.

“We want our followers on Google+ to feel that what they get is unique compared to what that get by visiting for example hm.com, Facebook or Twitter,” Ward says.

That’s important, Campbell says. The page “replicates not only the experience of shopping in the store, on the website or via the catalog, but also cultivates the feeling of exclusivity for people who interact with and embody the brand by supplying a constant stream of interactive content tailored specifically to the G+ following.”

Google+ vs. Facebook

Ok so H&M is king of the mountain on Google+, but Google’s network is little more than a sand castle in comparison to Facebook’s Everest, and H&M itself has 20 times more fans on Facebook.  Still brands should experiment with Google’s social media platform. Getting in at the still-ground level will allow you to embrace the spaghetti approach. Whatever sticks to the wall.

Some brands have tried to differentiate their Google+ pages from their Facebook pages through posting longer messages, says Joe Ciarallo of Buddy Media.

“Obviously that is different than Twitter, and slightly different than Facebook, where brands are either forced to, or choose to post short content because it sees higher engagement,” he says.

For Campbell, the big difference between Google+ and Facebook is all in the “circles” function.

“With this key tool, marketers get user interaction results in real-time,” she says. “No longer is there a need for private messaging or multiple email campaigns—content is both readily available within the network and targeted to different groups, all under the control of the account administrators.”

Campbell points out that H&M has blocked users from seeing who it’s added to its own circles. That may be a smart move, she says.

“I am safely betting that there are dedicated circles for each different type of user, from brand novices—people unfamiliar with H&M¡to brand advocators—people who promote H&M within their personal social networks.”

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Heineken wanted to create extra value from its sponsorship of the Open’er Festival in Poland, one of the world’s best music festivals. The aim of this campaign was to increase its number of fans while promoting the Heineken brand and its patronage of the Open’er event on Facebook in a unique and engaging way.

Graham Knowleswww.digitalguerilla.com.au @RAWTimes

 

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Employees have no protection from snooping bosses

Employees all too often think they are “bullet-proof” when they post anything on Facebook or Twitter. But as the law stands today, if they bring their employer into disrepute, the boss of the firm is well within their legal right to sack them, writes Emma Barnett.

You will have heard about a few high-profile cases in which someone has lost their job because of a Facebook or Twitter post.

However, the number you can reference is probably quite limited. And yet, according to lawyers, how bosses control the use of social media by their staff and utilise it to judge job candidates, is one of the biggest legal employment issues currently on the agenda.

Last month, John Flexman, a former human resources executive, began a tribunal against his former employer, BG Group (a major gas exploration firm based in Reading, Berks), accusing the firm of forcing him out after he put his CV online through LinkedIn. He is thought to be the first person in the country to bring a case for constructive dismissal after a dispute with bosses over his profile on the professional networking site.

Mr Flexman is claiming hundreds of thousands of pounds from BG Group, where he earned a £68,000 salary from his job in charge of graduate recruitment.

As well as uploading his CV, Mr Flexman ticked a box to register an interest in “career opportunities”.

But he was contacted by his manager while on holiday in the US and ordered to remove his CV. On his return, Mr Flexman was accused of “inappropriate use of social media” and called to attend an internal disciplinary hearing.

He was handed a list of disciplinary charges and told he could be sacked, Reading Employment Tribunal heard. He later resigned.

The outcome is still unknown, but the Flexman and BG Group tribunal is a rarity. Most cases of this nature are being settled outside court, as the majority of employers do not wish to have the negative publicity associated with clamping down on this area, according to Paula Whelan, an employment partner at Shakespeares law firm.

Now 30pc to 40pc of all Ms Whelan’s legal cases are social media-related but what are employers’ rights when it comes to snooping on staff and potential employees?

“Employees think they are bullet-proof when they post anything on Facebook or Twitter. But if they bring their employer into disrepute, the boss of that firm is well within their legal right to sack them,” she explains.

“By posting something even vaguely negative about your work on these social media sites, it’s breaking the relationship of trust and confidence between the employer and employee and the company reserves the right to sack the employee.”

Ms Wheelan advises that all companies update their IT policy and disciplinary procedures to reflect this new arena. And crucially – companies must make these changes extremely clear to their staff.

Revised IT policies at some of the forward-thinking companies now include the right of an employer to track anything an employee writes on a social network, if they do so using the company’s IT equipment.

Right now, companies are also well within their legal rights to sack a staff member over something they said referencing their job on their Facebook page (even if their privacy settings mean the world wide web cannot see their updates).

Equally, it still remains a grey area as to what type of comment on social media constitutes “bringing a company into disrepute”. Somebody writing “I had a terrible day at work”, and that person’s job being publicly available via a search on LinkedIn, could get somebody in trouble with their company, according to Ms Whelan – as it could make the firm concerned look like a bad place to work.

When is comes to recruiting, employers are still within their rights to perform an internet search on the candidate. However, where things can become tricky for an employer is if the interviewee (who didn’t get the job) feels they were discriminated against by additional information the interviewer judged them on after an internet search.

They can then request a “subject access requirement” under the data protection act, to see what information the interviewer has used to make his or her decision.

Currently, that will not include an internet search, as that is a process and not a document-based activity. However, Ms Whelan thinks that will change and employers, if making a recruitment decision using information gleaned from search engines such as Google, need to be prepared to document their internet searches.

Ultimately, the law has yet to catch up with social media and any changes to protect both the employer and employee need to come from overdue legislation and the Information Commissioner’s Office.

However, companies must be prudent and ensure that their IT policy is both flexible and up to date – to reflect the company’s stance on social media use. Plus, more than ever before, this position must be clearly communicated to all staff members.

By , Digital Media Editor The Telegraph UK

8:00AM GMT 19 Feb 2012

The question I am pondering today is whether Twitters latest attack on Google “Don’t be evil” (a reference to one of Google’s early mottoes) will actually backfire on them… Who is really getting upset about this other than Twitter, Facebook, etc? You? Me? Joe Blogs? I don’t think so.  In fact many, including me see Google+ as another opportunity in the sea of digital media.  Am I bothered that when someone googles ‘Graham Knowles‘ that my Google+ page comes within the first half of the first page?!?!?  Errrrr…

Lets face it this is not quite as simple as Google’s competitors would like us to believe.  In the latest war of Social Media tantrums Facebook, Twitter and MySpace have created a new web tool to direct users’ attention to what it considers are biased search results from Google.   hmmm were they biased when, because of a private commercial agreement between these companies, search results would first bring up these companies results above others?  The browser add-on, which only works for Firefox users, is called ‘Don’t be evil’ (a reference to one of Google’s early mottoes), and has been created in an attempt to stop the search giant from promoting its own social network, Google+, to the top of people’s web searches.

We the consumers are not quite as dumb as we are being treated and lets face it most consumers couldn’t care less about this little tiff.   We also don’t like hypocrisy, have you noticed Facebook promoting it’s own services, within it’s own arena?…noooo of course not! So what is wrong with Google announcing a search update called ‘Search Plus Your World, which means users will see more links to Google+ when they search the web, including in part of the results page usually set aside for advertising? It’s their arena after all and they are not excluding other results.  They never pretended to be anything other than Google the brand, the business, they never claim to be “The Global Independent Information Authority” (just made that up!).

So, do Twitter and the other social media giants really have a good point or do they just look like a bunch of foot stamping multi billion dollar babies?!?

Here’s some more info from recent press coverage:

It is the latest example of Google promoting its secondary services via search, a practice currently under investigation by European competition authorities for alleged monopoly abuses.

“You can find relevant Google+ posts from friends talking about an amazing trip they just took, whether they’ve shared privately with you or publicly,” Google said in a blog post.

“Starting today, if you search for a topic like [music] or [baseball], you might see prominent people who frequently discuss this topic on Google+ appearing on the right-hand side of the results page.”

The move angered Twitter. Its most senior lawyer, Alex Macgillivray, branded the launch a “bad day for the internet” and accused Google of “warping” search.

The update is only live in the US at the moment. However, engineers from Twitter, Facebook and MySpace, teamed up over the weekend to work with some developers from Firefox, to create the ‘Don’t be evil’ browser add-on, which will negate the effects of the latest Google update.

The open-source piece of software can be downloaded fromfocusontheuser.org. The site provides examples of search results using the tool.

Google was unavailable for comment.

Twitter followed Macgillivray’s comments earlier this month with an official statement complaining that “Your World” would make it harder for web users to find relevant tweets.

“For years, people have relied on Google to deliver the most relevant results anytime they wanted to find something on the Internet,” it said.

“Often, they want to know more about world events and breaking news. Twitter has emerged as a vital source of this real-time information, with more than 100 million users sending 250 million Tweets every day on virtually every topic. As we’ve seen time and time again, news breaks first on Twitter; as a result, Twitter accounts and Tweets are often the most relevant results.

“We’re concerned that as a result of Google’s changes, finding this information will be much harder for everyone. We think that’s bad for people, publishers, news organizations and Twitter users.”

Google responded via Google+, entering into an extraordinary public argument with Twitter.

It said it was “a bit surprised by Twitter’s comments about search plus Your World, because they chose not to renew their agreement with us last summer”.

The retaliation referred to Twitter’s refusal to allow Google to fully index tweets because it would agree to its terms. In October, its chief executive,Dick Costolo, told The Telegraph “we just can’t agree on what the appropriate value exchange is”.

Twitter does have a deal with Microsoft to allow Bing, Google’s biggest search engine rival, to index tweets.

Ok in our opinion he is not the most exciting speaker, however if you want to know about Personal Branding through Social Media you want to listen to Dan….  

 

Dan Schawbel is recognized as the leading authority on personal branding. With over 900,000 results for his name in Google, Fast Company calls Dan Schawbel “A personal branding force of nature” and The New York Times calls him “A personal branding guru.” Recently, BusinessWeek named Dan Schawbel as “One of twenty people that entrepreneurs should follow on Twitter,” alongside Richard Branson and Details Magazine cited Dan as one of “Five internet guru’s that can make you rich” alongside Seth Godin. In 2007, Dan Schawbel helped create one of the first social media positions in a Fortune 500 company.

Dan Schawbel – Personal Branding Blog

 

 

 

 

Google’s social network, Google+, has attracted more than 62 million registered users in its bid to close the gap on Facebook, according to unofficial figures.

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