Posts Tagged ‘personal branding’

The best way to learn is by example. You might know the theory and best practices behind key marketing decisions, but it’s a whole different situation to actually see these tips applied. You want to see what other successful marketers are doing, don’t you?

Grab Hubspot’s “101 Examples of Effective Calls-to-Action” to find out what works and how you can incorporate successful practices in your marketing. These examples will inspire you, foster your creativity, and prepare you to create some stellar calls-to-action.

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In this ebook, you will see examples of calls-to-action that:

* Make good use of text and video
* Facilitate segmentation of buyer personas
* Reduce visitors’ anxiety and offer incentives for conversion
* Incorporate smart design decisions
and more!

Learn how to optimize your website to generate more traffic in your location and around the world!

Search Engine Optimization is a crucial marketing tactic for letting search engine users discover your website. If your business has an audience in multiple countries, there are more techniques that can help you get found online more often.

Download this guide to learn the top 50 international SEO techniques you can use to optimize your website for maximum traffic generation. This eBook is a must-have for the international marketer who wants to learn how to rank high in search engines.

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We’re all loving this video studying the behaviour of the modern generations.
Baby Boomer, Gen X, Gen Y, Millennial…what are you?

Graham Knowles –  www.digitalguerilla.com.au

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Graham Knowles –  www.digitalguerilla.com.au

A Content Strategy Roadmap
by Kristina Halvorson on Apr 27, 2012

How to make a website: discover, define, design, develop, deploy. It’s a familiar framework for most of our project processes. Now along comes this content strategy thing. Sure, it sounds like a great idea, but how does it fit in with what we’re already doing? Walk through a a typical website project to find out how content strategy fits (and why it will make you so happy!)

Information graphics, visual representations of data known as infographics, keep the web going these days. Web users, with their diminishing attention spans, are inexorably drawn to these shiny, brightly coloured messages with small, relevant, clearly-displayed nuggets of information. They’re straight to the point, usually factually interesting and often give you a wake-up call as to what those statistics really mean.infographics

Who can resist a colourful, thoughtful venn diagram anyway? In terms of blogging success, infographics are far more likely to be shared than your average blog post. This means more eyeballs on your important information, more people rallying for your cause, more backlinks and more visits to your blog. In short, a quality infographic done well could be what your blog needs right now.

 

Designing An Infographic

Some great tips for designing infographics:

  • Keep it simple! Don’t try to do too much in one picture.
  • Decide on a colour scheme.
  • Research some great facts and statistics.
  • Think of it as a visual essay: ensure your arguments hold and are relevant.
  • Remember that it’s all about quickly conveying the meaning behind complex data.
  • Draw conclusions.
  • Reference your facts in the infographic.
  • Include your URL so people can be sure who made it.

infographics

Ideas for infographic formats include:

  • Timelines;
  • Flow charts;
  • Annotated maps;
  • Graphs;
  • Venn diagrams;
  • Size comparisons;
  • Showing familiar objects or similar size or value.

Here are some great tutorials on infographic creation:

Creating Your Infographic

  • Plan and research.
  • If required, use free software to create simple graphs and visualisations of data.
  • Use vector graphic software to bring these visualisations into the one graphic.

Ultimately, if you have a little design skill, the very best approach is to create all the simple graphs and illustrations yourself using vector graphic software. Your end result will be more visually attractive and you will have more freedom to be creative with it.

 

Free Online Tools For Creating Infographics

Stat Planet

Stat Planet allows you to create some amazing interactive visualisations, which you can then use as is or create a static image. It can be used within your browser or downloaded for free. Stat Planet gives you access to some great world data and lets you customise that in your visualisations. It also has some great map-based visualisations to try.

information graphics

Hohli

Hohli is an intuitive, simple online chart maker. It’s incredibly easy to pick your chart type, add some data, vary the sizes and colours and see the finished chart. The finished charts are also very well designed and look great!

information graphics

Creately

Creately lets you make easy-to-make diagrams and flow charts (easy to collaborate too). When you start, you can choose from a number of purpose-designed diagram types and quickly add your data to make your own chart. The end result looks very professional.

information graphics

New York Times

New York Times’ Visualization Lab lets you use statistics from recent NYTimes articles to create visualisations in various formats. You can also see other people’s visualisations and see how other people choose to display the same data.

data graphics

Many Eyes

Many Eyes lets you upload your own data or use data already stored on the site. The visualisations themselves are well-designed and very professional-looking. This is definitely the easiest way to use your own data for online visualisations.

data graphics

Google Public Data

Google Public Data lets you easily take public data and transform it into an infographic of your choice. These beautiful, colourful graphics simplify and communicate the data perfectly.

data graphics

Wordle

Wordle lets you create word visualisations using text you enter. There are plenty of interesting designs to choose from. Enter whole books, short passages or see what other people have used. In this example, we can see the US constitution visualised.

Free Software For Creating Infographics

Tableau

Tableau is a free Windows-only software for creating visualisations. As you can see, these impressive graphs are colourful and quite unique.

Gapminder

GapMinder is a free Adobe Air (cross-platform by nature) application to ensure you have current data on major world issues and can create visualisations for your purposes. Data is updated yearly and released with new versions of the application. The visuals are also quite impressive!

Inkscape

Inkscape is a free vector graphic software available for many platforms. This is the ideal free option for the creation of your overall infographic. Simple and intuitive, you should have no problems importing your visualisations and combining them with other visuals to create your masterpiece.

infographics

Love Infographics?

If you’re a fan of infographics, these tools will probably become part of your everyday blogging tools. Feel free to let us know of more great tools in the comments!

Also, check out some of MakeUseOf’s favourite infographics:

Cadbury Makes Its Google+ Page Out of Chocolate.

Cadbury loves Google+ and are pumping up on the great PR they have already received by switching their allegiances from Facebook. Not only has the UK-based chocolatier launched a product through Google’s social network, has also now created a chocolate version of its Google+ page.

The confection was created to celebrate a recent milestone: 500,000 “circlers,” or fans.

Cadbury chronicled the construction of its edible Google+ page through a series of 10 step-by-step photos, shown in this gallery.

Heineken wanted to create extra value from its sponsorship of the Open’er Festival in Poland, one of the world’s best music festivals. The aim of this campaign was to increase its number of fans while promoting the Heineken brand and its patronage of the Open’er event on Facebook in a unique and engaging way.

Graham Knowleswww.digitalguerilla.com.au @RAWTimes

 

Digital Guerilla on Facebook

Mission Control Doc for Facebook Brand Pages

 

Employees have no protection from snooping bosses

Employees all too often think they are “bullet-proof” when they post anything on Facebook or Twitter. But as the law stands today, if they bring their employer into disrepute, the boss of the firm is well within their legal right to sack them, writes Emma Barnett.

You will have heard about a few high-profile cases in which someone has lost their job because of a Facebook or Twitter post.

However, the number you can reference is probably quite limited. And yet, according to lawyers, how bosses control the use of social media by their staff and utilise it to judge job candidates, is one of the biggest legal employment issues currently on the agenda.

Last month, John Flexman, a former human resources executive, began a tribunal against his former employer, BG Group (a major gas exploration firm based in Reading, Berks), accusing the firm of forcing him out after he put his CV online through LinkedIn. He is thought to be the first person in the country to bring a case for constructive dismissal after a dispute with bosses over his profile on the professional networking site.

Mr Flexman is claiming hundreds of thousands of pounds from BG Group, where he earned a £68,000 salary from his job in charge of graduate recruitment.

As well as uploading his CV, Mr Flexman ticked a box to register an interest in “career opportunities”.

But he was contacted by his manager while on holiday in the US and ordered to remove his CV. On his return, Mr Flexman was accused of “inappropriate use of social media” and called to attend an internal disciplinary hearing.

He was handed a list of disciplinary charges and told he could be sacked, Reading Employment Tribunal heard. He later resigned.

The outcome is still unknown, but the Flexman and BG Group tribunal is a rarity. Most cases of this nature are being settled outside court, as the majority of employers do not wish to have the negative publicity associated with clamping down on this area, according to Paula Whelan, an employment partner at Shakespeares law firm.

Now 30pc to 40pc of all Ms Whelan’s legal cases are social media-related but what are employers’ rights when it comes to snooping on staff and potential employees?

“Employees think they are bullet-proof when they post anything on Facebook or Twitter. But if they bring their employer into disrepute, the boss of that firm is well within their legal right to sack them,” she explains.

“By posting something even vaguely negative about your work on these social media sites, it’s breaking the relationship of trust and confidence between the employer and employee and the company reserves the right to sack the employee.”

Ms Wheelan advises that all companies update their IT policy and disciplinary procedures to reflect this new arena. And crucially – companies must make these changes extremely clear to their staff.

Revised IT policies at some of the forward-thinking companies now include the right of an employer to track anything an employee writes on a social network, if they do so using the company’s IT equipment.

Right now, companies are also well within their legal rights to sack a staff member over something they said referencing their job on their Facebook page (even if their privacy settings mean the world wide web cannot see their updates).

Equally, it still remains a grey area as to what type of comment on social media constitutes “bringing a company into disrepute”. Somebody writing “I had a terrible day at work”, and that person’s job being publicly available via a search on LinkedIn, could get somebody in trouble with their company, according to Ms Whelan – as it could make the firm concerned look like a bad place to work.

When is comes to recruiting, employers are still within their rights to perform an internet search on the candidate. However, where things can become tricky for an employer is if the interviewee (who didn’t get the job) feels they were discriminated against by additional information the interviewer judged them on after an internet search.

They can then request a “subject access requirement” under the data protection act, to see what information the interviewer has used to make his or her decision.

Currently, that will not include an internet search, as that is a process and not a document-based activity. However, Ms Whelan thinks that will change and employers, if making a recruitment decision using information gleaned from search engines such as Google, need to be prepared to document their internet searches.

Ultimately, the law has yet to catch up with social media and any changes to protect both the employer and employee need to come from overdue legislation and the Information Commissioner’s Office.

However, companies must be prudent and ensure that their IT policy is both flexible and up to date – to reflect the company’s stance on social media use. Plus, more than ever before, this position must be clearly communicated to all staff members.

By , Digital Media Editor The Telegraph UK

8:00AM GMT 19 Feb 2012

The question I am pondering today is whether Twitters latest attack on Google “Don’t be evil” (a reference to one of Google’s early mottoes) will actually backfire on them… Who is really getting upset about this other than Twitter, Facebook, etc? You? Me? Joe Blogs? I don’t think so.  In fact many, including me see Google+ as another opportunity in the sea of digital media.  Am I bothered that when someone googles ‘Graham Knowles‘ that my Google+ page comes within the first half of the first page?!?!?  Errrrr…

Lets face it this is not quite as simple as Google’s competitors would like us to believe.  In the latest war of Social Media tantrums Facebook, Twitter and MySpace have created a new web tool to direct users’ attention to what it considers are biased search results from Google.   hmmm were they biased when, because of a private commercial agreement between these companies, search results would first bring up these companies results above others?  The browser add-on, which only works for Firefox users, is called ‘Don’t be evil’ (a reference to one of Google’s early mottoes), and has been created in an attempt to stop the search giant from promoting its own social network, Google+, to the top of people’s web searches.

We the consumers are not quite as dumb as we are being treated and lets face it most consumers couldn’t care less about this little tiff.   We also don’t like hypocrisy, have you noticed Facebook promoting it’s own services, within it’s own arena?…noooo of course not! So what is wrong with Google announcing a search update called ‘Search Plus Your World, which means users will see more links to Google+ when they search the web, including in part of the results page usually set aside for advertising? It’s their arena after all and they are not excluding other results.  They never pretended to be anything other than Google the brand, the business, they never claim to be “The Global Independent Information Authority” (just made that up!).

So, do Twitter and the other social media giants really have a good point or do they just look like a bunch of foot stamping multi billion dollar babies?!?

Here’s some more info from recent press coverage:

It is the latest example of Google promoting its secondary services via search, a practice currently under investigation by European competition authorities for alleged monopoly abuses.

“You can find relevant Google+ posts from friends talking about an amazing trip they just took, whether they’ve shared privately with you or publicly,” Google said in a blog post.

“Starting today, if you search for a topic like [music] or [baseball], you might see prominent people who frequently discuss this topic on Google+ appearing on the right-hand side of the results page.”

The move angered Twitter. Its most senior lawyer, Alex Macgillivray, branded the launch a “bad day for the internet” and accused Google of “warping” search.

The update is only live in the US at the moment. However, engineers from Twitter, Facebook and MySpace, teamed up over the weekend to work with some developers from Firefox, to create the ‘Don’t be evil’ browser add-on, which will negate the effects of the latest Google update.

The open-source piece of software can be downloaded fromfocusontheuser.org. The site provides examples of search results using the tool.

Google was unavailable for comment.

Twitter followed Macgillivray’s comments earlier this month with an official statement complaining that “Your World” would make it harder for web users to find relevant tweets.

“For years, people have relied on Google to deliver the most relevant results anytime they wanted to find something on the Internet,” it said.

“Often, they want to know more about world events and breaking news. Twitter has emerged as a vital source of this real-time information, with more than 100 million users sending 250 million Tweets every day on virtually every topic. As we’ve seen time and time again, news breaks first on Twitter; as a result, Twitter accounts and Tweets are often the most relevant results.

“We’re concerned that as a result of Google’s changes, finding this information will be much harder for everyone. We think that’s bad for people, publishers, news organizations and Twitter users.”

Google responded via Google+, entering into an extraordinary public argument with Twitter.

It said it was “a bit surprised by Twitter’s comments about search plus Your World, because they chose not to renew their agreement with us last summer”.

The retaliation referred to Twitter’s refusal to allow Google to fully index tweets because it would agree to its terms. In October, its chief executive,Dick Costolo, told The Telegraph “we just can’t agree on what the appropriate value exchange is”.

Twitter does have a deal with Microsoft to allow Bing, Google’s biggest search engine rival, to index tweets.